Breakout Sessions

* Indicates ticketed session.


The Next Generation of New Urbanists: A One-Day Congress

Wednesday, May 9, 2012 | 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

Students, professionals, advocates, and new members will interact, debate, present ideas, and explore innovative ways to improve our built and natural environment. NextGen seeks to advance CNU through open source collaboration and encouraging participation among diverse experience levels, backgrounds, and fields. Help us build momentum and join the discussion. For additional program details and to connect digitally in advance of the session, visit www.cnunextgen.org.

Will Dowdy, Associate, Anderson|Kim Architecture+Urban Design


Space, the First but Not Final Frontier: Analyzing space, uses, and transportation

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Showcasing research on the relationship between urban form and New Urbanism, a number of papers were selected for their academic rigor, originality, scholarship, and creativity. If you are interested in the most recent urban form investigations and trends, you won’t want to miss this session.

M. Gordon Brown, Principal, Space Analytics,llc

Valentin Hadelich, Assistant Professor, Bauhaus University Weimar & Urban INDEX Institute GmbH

Paul L. Knight, Intern Architect and Urban Designer, Historical Concepts

Wesley Marshall, Ph.D., P.E., Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Colorado, Denver

Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Principal , Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company


Open Source Congress

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

The Open Source Congress is the DIY forum that arises annually during the Congress for the New Urbanism. You can use the time and space to talk about new ideas, find help on a thorny problem, or work on a CNU initiative.

Follow updates on Twitter at #cnuopen.

After the Congress
This year, the Open Source notes and follow-up will truly be do-it-yourself. Open Source Hosts will be given a sign-in sheet to keep for participants’ contact information. A Posterous site has been set up for posting session notes, and anyone with the site email address can post their notes simply by emailing them to the address. If participants want to move Initiative items forward, they should contact CNU staff after the Congress.
http://cnu-open-source-congress.posterous.com/
To post, send email to cnu-open-source-congress@posterous.com


Where is the Market Taking Us?

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

A series of demographic and economic forces are coming together to radically change the housing market in the coming decade. Find out how this will shape urbanism in North America today and in the future.

Experts on the market tell us how changing demographics and consumer preference will shape how New Urbanism is planned and built in the next decade.

Lawrence Frank, Ph.D., AICP, CIP, ASLA, President, Urban Design 4 Health

Shyam Kannan, Principal, RCLCO

Kennedy Smith, Principal, Community Land Use and Economics Group

Laurie Volk, Co-Managing Director, Zimmerman/Volk Associates


The Real Deal: Implemented lncremental Urbanism

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Sustainable Design (LU/HSW/SD)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

With today's radically different development economics comes renewed interest in smaller projects which, in some markets, are becoming the norm. Financial constraints, combined with the desire to leverage existing infrastructure for optimal sustainability, are making urban infill projects the most sensible direction for growth. This session will present a variety of recently-constructed projects - residential, mixed-use, and adaptive re-use - from around the country. Developers and designers will present lessons learned, including how challenges of financing, zoning and permitting were overcome.

Sarah A. Lewis, R.A., CNU-A, LEED AP, Associate/Project Director, Fuss & O'Neill

Donald Powers, AIA, Leed AP, Founding Partner, Union Studio, Architecture & Community Design

Linda Pruitt, President, The Cottage Company

Robert Sharp, Principal, Robert Sharp Architect, Inc., Partners for Better Housing


Too Much Water or Too Little? Using the Landscape to Advance Regional Sustainability Without Destroying Urbanism: A Florida Transect

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Sustainable Design (LU/HSW/SD)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session will discuss the practical use of landscape techniques to advance regional sustainability in Florida and whether these techniques can be utilized without undermining urbanism. We will also discuss the landscape consequences of reasonably anticipated sea-level rise. Will the Keys disappear by 2015 or will salt-water intrusion transform the coastal life? For purposes of this session, "landscape" is broadly used to include the site, storm-water management, urban agriculture, green roofs and walls, streams, right-of-ways, parks and green infrastructure.

Jonathan Barnett, Professor of City and Regional Planning , Department of City and Regional Planning University of Pennsylvania

Stephanie Bothwell, ASLA, Principal, Urban & Landscape Design

Marcela Camblor-Cutsaimanis, Principal, Marcela Camblor & Associates

Daniel K. Slone, Esquire, Partner, McGuireWoods LLP

Lee Sobel, Real Estate Development and Finance Analyst, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Office of Policy, Economics and Innovation


The Secret Life of Trees

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Health, Safety & Welfare (LU/HSW)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Trees are an important element in making successful public realms. There are physical, chemical, psychological, visual and health benefits to planting trees in areas of human habitation, however, decisions made by architects, planners and urban designers often prevent the healthy growth of vegetation. This session will examine techniques, physical limitations, and maintenance strategies for incorporating trees in new and existing developments.

Keith Bowers, FASLA, RLA, PWS, President, Biohabitats Inc.

Mary Dennis, B Dennis Town & Building Design

Dennis McGlade, Principal, OLIN Partnership


Parking: Planning to Store the Cars Properly, Amid the Pedestrians!

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Parking is a vital design component of New Urbanism, but requires comprehensive thought for planning and subsequent operations. Suburban sprawl's parking policies thwart compact urban placemaking. Too much parking and the scale of a development is blown out; too little and places starve for lack of financing and approvals. How do we strike a balance? How can a designer know if it is more cost effective to make better use of existing parking than build new? Shared parking sounds like a good solution, but how does one decide on the right number to build, and craft the legal agreements to make it work? How do innovations like car-sharing programs, parking wayfinding technology, and social media impact how many spaces should be built and how they should be managed? How can parking be designed so that it's easy to find for motorists and minimizes negative impacts on pedestrians and property values?

This session will begin with case studies for Seaside, Florida and Savannah, Georgia, where parking solutions were provided to maximize supply and use, while preserving the City's compact urban, walkable structure. These case studies will highlight innovative parking management recommendations, physical on-street parking design and steps to avoiding suburban policy creep. Next, specific guidance will be provided on the latest tools for estimating actual parking demand, managing parking effectively, and designing parking graciously. Finally, there will be time for participants to talk directly with experts to solve specific parking problems in local communities.

Tracy Hegler, AICP, Planning Director, Richland County Planning & Development Services

Jeff Tumlin, Principal, Nelson\Nygaard Consulting Associates


CNU 20 Art Room: Photographing the Building, Street, and Town by Sandy Sorlien

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

Learn critical fundamentals to keep in mind when photographing urbanism. You’ll also learn to use simple digital image editing tools to adjust and correct problematic photos and improve your visual communication.
Bring a laptop with some photographs that you wish were better and would like to work on. Or just learn by watching as Sandy adjusts her bad raw images to make them look good. Was the subject compelling but the light was too flat, or do the buildings look distorted, or are there are distracting elements we should get rid of? You’ll learn to use five simple image editing tools to improve your visual communication: Levels, Rubber Stamp, Perspective Correction, Color Adjustment, and Crop. A quick virtual tour of the Transect Collection image bank will provide models for more effective composition the next time you go out to shoot New (or old) Urbanism, ensuring that frontages are legible and that skinny streets look skinny.

James Dougherty, Director of Design, Dover, Kohl & Partners

Sandy Sorlien, Transect Codes Council


Why We Write: Prominent New Urbanist Authors Discuss Their Classic NU Books and Current Works, and the Critical Importance of Writing to the Movement

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Join this moderated discussion with the authors of path-breaking, "core" New Urbanist books. Listen to the reconsideration of cornerstone texts that were influential in shaping the movement and how they relate to the authors' current ideas. Discussion of the critical importance of writing to the movement and gaps in the literature on the theory, practice and relevance of the New Urbanism to contemporary challenges will be addressed. The authors will share their ideas on writing influential texts on walkable, mixed-use communities.

Chuck Bohl, Professor and Director, School of Architecture, University of Miami

Peter Katz, Consultant and author of The New Urbanism: Toward an Architecture of Community,

James Howard Kunstler, Author

Philip Langdon, Senior Editor, Better! Cities & Towns

Charles Marohn, Jr., P.E., AICP, Executive Director, Strong Towns


Pro Formas for the Rest of Us

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The ways people make money and lose money with building projects are not mysterious; but the methods used by developers to assess and manage risk can be opaque to those who don't use them every day.

The presenters will teach you how to use the basic tool for understanding a project's feasibility and profitability, the pro forma.

What does it mean when a developer says they "can't make the numbers work"? Which numbers? How do these numbers work over time? If the pro forma is based upon assumptions, how can I test those assumptions in the real world? How important is the price of land or the allowed density within the overall project?

This session includes an exercise in which participants will use a static pro forma to an infill rental housing project and test a range of real world problems, delayed entitlements, construction cost overruns, and changes in financing. Spreadsheet files of model static and multiyear pro formas will be provided.

R. John Anderson, Principal, Anderson Kim Architecture + Urban Design

Richard Hunt, CNU-A, Principal, Peloton Research Partners


Why Did We Stop Walking & How do We Start Again? The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The New Urbanist vision for balanced mobility is greatly strengthened when we know the full history of contemporary auto dominance. Strategies implementing New Urbanist form turn on this historic story. Session attendees will gain a clear understanding of the critical evolution of automobility in urban environments. Discussion will inform New Urbanists of this history.

Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverse and included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets were primarily motor thoroughfares where children did not belong and where pedestrians were condemned as "jaywalkers." In Fighting Traffic, Peter Norton argues that to accommodate automobiles, the American city required not only a physical change, but also a social one: before the city could be reconstructed for the sake of motorists, its streets had to be socially reconstructed, creating a vision of places where motorists belonged. It was not an evolution, he writes, but a bloody and sometimes violent revolution. Street users struggled to define and redefine what streets were for. Norton examines the crucial transitional years from the 1910s to the 1930s, uncovering a broad anti-automobile campaign that reviled motorists as "road hogs" or "speed demons" and cars as "juggernauts" or "death cars." He considers the perspectives of all users—pedestrians, police (who had to become "traffic cops"), street railways, downtown businesses, traffic engineers (who often saw cars as the problem, not the solution), and automobile promoters. He finds that pedestrians and parents campaigned in moral terms, fighting for "justice." Cities and downtown businesses tried to regulate traffic in the name of "efficiency." Automotive interest groups, meanwhile, legitimized their claim to the streets by invoking "freedom"—a rhetorical stance of particular power in the United States up to this day.

Eric Dumbaugh, Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator, School of Urban and Regional Planning, Florida Atlantic University

Richard Hall, P.E., President, Hall Planning & Engineering Inc.

Peter Norton, Assistant Professor , Department of Science, Technology, and Society at the University of Virginia


Making Urban Facades

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Athena Award Winner Michael Dennis will share his insights on urban design principles and making urban facades. Urban facades are critical in the making of unified and composite streets. The session will survey the typology of urban facades from the Renaissance to present day. Facades will be categorized by compositional strategies: centralized, lateral, self-referential, symmetrical, and asymmetrical. The analysis and taxonomy survey will conclude with a review of design guideline strategies for making apt urban facades.

Michael Dennis, Principal-in-Charge, Michael Dennis and Associates (MDA)

Dhiru Thadani, AIA, Architect + Urbanist


Two Traditions of Latin American Urbanism

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The Law of the Indies resulted in the wonderful gridded places that we admire, like Antigua Guatemala and Villa de Leyva, Colombia. The Portuguese brought over their own nameless, organic method which was highly topo-responsive and unlike the Law of the Indies, did not shy away from sloping sites for places to inaugurate cities. This resulted in the highly irregular plans of many Brazilian towns and cities like Salvador, Ouro Preto, Goiás, Mariana, Tiradentes, Diamantina, and São Fransisco.

This session will compare and contrast the urbanism of these two different spheres and explore two colonial Brazilian examples that are directly influenced by the Hispanic Laws of the Indies.

Eduardo Castillo, Principal, Castillo Arquitectos, Guatemala

Andrew Georgiadis, Dover Kohl & Partners

Maria Elisa Mercer, Project Manager/Business Development in South America, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company


CNU 20 Art Room: Rendering in Pen and Ink by Eric Osth

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

Effective line drawing is fundamental to the delineation of architecture and urbanism. You’ll learn a classic, easy-to-follow line drawing process combining the study of architectural proportions with time-tested pen and ink drawing techniques.

In the early part of the twentieth century, pen and ink perspective illustration technique for delineating architecture and urbanism reached a zenith. Drawings of this era were famous for their use of composition, tones and white space to create remarkable, memorable images that are still valued today.

In this session, Eric Osth, AIA, Principal at Urban Design Associates, will explore the process and techniques for creating these illustrations. As an illustrator and a designer of architecture and urban design, Eric uses three-dimensional illustrations in both presentation and design. Eric will teach an easy-to-follow process that combines study of architectural proportions with drawing technique that can benefit future design efforts and drawing exercises alike.

The session will start with the basics of drawing set up including selecting your subject, your viewpoint, and drawing ‘focus’. A simple, easy-to-follow drawing exercise will put basic and advanced techniques to use, and at the same time, identify future areas for learning. Handouts, paper and pens will be provided.

Eric Osth, AIA, Principal, Urban Design Associates


Heterodoxia Architectonica

Thursday, May 10, 2012 | 3:45PM - 5:00pm
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Will this generation bore deeper into refinement and elitism, or will it endeavor to spread classical architecture outwards to a broad, democratic, indeed populist future? Will they continue reprinting ever more esoteric treatises, or will they write new ones conceived to serve, not the 16th or even the 20th century, but the future which is upon us? How can there be a viable canon of architecture that is incapable of producing an opening wider than it is high. I propose a new ethos: one no longer dedication to the polishing of the classical canon of Vitruvius, Palladio and Vignola, but to supplementing that canon. An expanded canon would include newly drawn plates alongside Vignolas: the Orders of masters such as Gilly, Soane, Thompson, Garnier, Perret, Hoffman, Loos, Asplund, Piacentini, Terragni, Stern, Graves, Porphyrios and Rob Krier. This treatise would claim an enormous amount of new territory for classicism. We are almost there. We have only to climb one last Everest.

Andrés Duany, Principal, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company


Open Source Congress

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 5:00 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

The Open Source Congress is the DIY forum that arises annually during the Congress for the New Urbanism. You can use the time and space to talk about new ideas, find help on a thorny problem, or work on a CNU initiative.

Follow updates on Twitter at #cnuopen.

After the Congress
This year, the Open Source notes and follow-up will truly be do-it-yourself. Open Source Hosts will be given a sign-in sheet to keep for participants’ contact information. A Posterous site has been set up for posting session notes, and anyone with the site email address can post their notes simply by emailing them to the address. If participants want to move Initiative items forward, they should contact CNU staff after the Congress.
http://cnu-open-source-congress.posterous.com/
To post, send email to cnu-open-source-congress@posterous.com


From Research to Practice: What’s missing?

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session addresses the gap between research findings and practical applications in New Urbanism. Panelists provide insight from the perspective of universities, think tanks, government agencies, and practice in the fields of design, development, and law. Participants will briefly present their own experience with the current context, as well as best-case scenarios. The majority of the session will engage participants in discussion on future initiatives.

Jonathan Barnett, Professor of City and Regional Planning , Department of City and Regional Planning University of Pennsylvania

Stephanie Bothwell, ASLA, Principal, Urban & Landscape Design

Lawrence Frank, Ph.D., AICP, CIP, ASLA, President, Urban Design 4 Health

Joanna Lombard, Professor, University of Miami


The New Town of Cayalá, Guatemala

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session will focus on the design, development, and history of one of the most important New Urbanism projects by Leon Krier in Central America.

Richard Economakis, Associate Professor, University of Notre Dame

Pedro Godoy, President, Estudio Urbano

Léon Krier, Architect and Urban Planner

Maria Fernanda Sanchez, Vice President, Estudio Urbano


Philanthropy and the New Urbanism

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Philanthropy and the New Urbanism features top philanthropic leaders sharing their views of urbanism as a key factor in transformational change. The eponymous founders of The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation and The Oram Foundation/Fund for the Environment & Urban Life join Jerry Maldonado of the Ford Foundation to discuss how they make decisions that help their foundations meet their goals.

Richard H. Driehaus, Chairman
Driehaus Capital Management LLC, President, The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation


Jerry Maldonado, Program Officer, Ford Foundation

Richard L. Oram, Chairman, Oram Foundation, Inc.

Rob Steuteville, Editor/Publisher, New Urban News


The Economic Benefit of Good Urbanism

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Sustainable Design (LU/HSW/SD)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Urbanism has been engaged by most municipalities as an apologetic or alternative form of development, to the perceived "market driven" sprawl that most communities face. Yet innovative financial and policy analysis has demonstrated that mixed-use development is not only more beneficial for the environment, but also the fiscally responsible form of growth. This session explores analytic tools, property policy, as well as design strategies that can repair the larger urban fabric. The panel will explain and de-mystify tax policy, as well as a walk through of the communication tools that will help planners and decision makers understand urban design alternatives. We not only focus on solutions to repair our built environment, but to steal a line from the movie Jerry Maguire, we are going to "Show you the money!"

Peter Katz, Consultant and author of The New Urbanism: Toward an Architecture of Community,

Joseph Minicozzi, AICP, New Projects Director, Public Interest Projects, Inc.

Michael Pagano, Dean, College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago

Galina Tachieva, Partner, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company


From Balanced Roads to Transit Oriented Development

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Hear from public, private and Florida Department of Transportation designers and planners about how we can have a more balanced transportation system that recognizes the important role of walking and biking. This session will address topics including: Alternatives to wide arterials, Transit Oriented Developments in Massachusetts and Toronto, Fare-Free Transit, and Cycling Habits.

Andrew Boenau, AICP, Transportation Planning Manager, AECOM

Jessica Hawes, Senior Associate, Brook McIlroy

Kevin Klinkenberg, Senior Planner, Olsson Associates

William Lindeke, PHD Candidate, University of Minnesota

Anne McIlroy, Principal, Brook McIlroy

John Moore, Systems Planner, Florida DOT

George Proakis, AICP, Director of Planning, City of Somerville, MA

Mary Taylor Raulerson, City Planner/Transportation Planner, Glatting Jackson Kercher Anglin, Inc.

David Sajecki, Senior Advisor, Metrolinx


The Misunderstood Transect: Theory vs. Practice in New Urbanist Codes

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 1:30 PM
AIA credits approved: 2.75
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The Rural-to-Urban Transect seems intuitive, commonsense, observable. Even now it is possible to see an American pattern of countryside to suburbs to cities. In their early essays, NU theorists assumed that the Transect described that regional pattern, as if seen from ten thousand feet. But actual practice has been different; nearly every Transect-based code covers an area comprehensible from a bird's eye or hilltop, not an airliner.

In NU regulating plans, the T-zones are applied at the fine grain of several zones per pedestrian shed. Is there more than one useful Transect? How did some Transect-based codes end up encouraging sprawl? How did the SmartCode sort out the different scales? What are the sticking points for a more widespread understanding of this powerful coding framework?

In hindsight, we can trace a path from the 18th century continental drawings of Humboldt to early German and American context-based zoning codes, through the 1986 Seaside Urban Code and 1990s TND Ordinances, and finally to the 21st century model SmartCode, and the widespread adoption of its calibrations and of other Transect-based codes.

This session is not just a history lesson; it will be a clear-eyed, self-critical look at why certain key concepts fell by the wayside, and how we can sort them out.

Diagnoses by
Andrés Duany
Sandy Sorlien

Paul Crabtree, P.E., President, Crabtree Group, Inc.

Andrés Duany, Principal, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Matthew Lambert, Partner, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Sandy Sorlien, Transect Codes Council

Emily Talen, Ph.D., AICP, Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University


CNU 20 Art Room: SketchUp as a Foundation for Quick Charrette Hand Drawing by Kenneth Garcia & Eduardo Castillo

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

Are you interested in learning how to produce quick charrette renderings? First, you’ll learn how to build a quick 3D model in SketchUp to use as a drawing base – then we’ll concentrate on accelerated charrette hand drawing overlay techniques.

Join Eduardo & Kenneth for this session where they demonstrate how to use SketchUp as a foundation for quick, hand-drawn renderings. Charrettes often require multiple renderings to be produced during a very short period of time. Using a combination of 3D computer modeling and hand drawing techniques gives these illustrators the ability to work with the speed and flexibility needed to produce convincing, artful renderings within the short deadlines required by charrettes. The first portion of the session will concentrate on how to build a quick 3D model to use as a base. The second portion of the session will focus on accelerated hand drawing techniques. Bring your laptop with Google SketchUp installed to try out the ideas presented.

Eduardo Castillo, Principal, Castillo Arquitectos, Guatemala

Kenneth Garcia, Town Planner, Dover, Kohl & Partners


Meta-Physical Planning, All You Need Is Love

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
1.25 AICP Credits.
Please check back for updates on AIA Credits

People have always known what to do. People have always created out of their innermost spirits what they needed exactly for their lives and for their villages and their towns and their cities. Now you must not trust those experts, those others. You really must trust your innermost spirits," Christopher Alexander, The Timeless Way of Building

The ever popular Meta-Physical Planning is back for the twentieth anniversary of the Congress for New Urbanism. This year's session will combine themes from past seances: everything is connected, the work of Christopher Alexander, the physical and meta-physical experiences of New Urbanists, stop acting like a Muggle, and all you need is love.

As always, the MPP attendees will be the speakers in this open-mike session. Regular attendees in the past have included Douglas Duany, James Howard Kunstler, Ann Daigle, Laura Hall and Philip Bess, Medieval Theologian.

John Massengale, Principal, Massengale & Co LLC


CNU 20 ART ROOM: RESEARCHING & DOCUMENTING NEW URBANISM

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

The Seaside Research Portal (seaside.library.nd.edu) represents a new way to archive, organize, and present architecture, planning, and the built environment online. It is a collaborative project between the University of Notre Dame's School of Architecture and Hesburgh Libraries and the community of Seaside, Florida. It allows one to research Seaside, the first New Urban community, from the urban scale down to the individual building scale by combining maps, plans, photographs, essays, oral histories, and other visual documentation into a unique multi-media site. The Portal is designed for and populated primarily by students and is comprised of the archives of Seaside, code and plan documentation from Duany Plater-Zyberk and Co., and archival material from those who have built at Seaside.

Jennifer Parker, Associate Librarian, University of Notre Dame Architecture Library

Katlyn Springstead, Lead Student and Content Coordinator, Seaside Research Portal


Urban Freeways: Devastation and Opportunity

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 2:00PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Sustainable Design (LU/HSW/SD)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session will explore the history of urban freeways such as Miami's Overtown Expressway, New Orleans' Claiborne Expressway, and Boston's Big Dig. Panelists will discuss how urban freeways destroyed traditional, often poor, neighborhoods, and what is being done today to repair the urban fabric and make cities whole again.

John DeStefano, Jr., Mayor of New Haven, City of New Haven

Anthony Garcia, Principal, The Street Plans Collaborative

John O. Norquist, President and CEO, Congress for the New Urbanism

Alison Richardson


Moving Lifelong Communities to Scale

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 2:00PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The long anticipated growth in the older adult population will reach an unprecedented peak over the next two decades. It’s clear that the nation’s current housing, transportation and healthcare infrastructure will not adequately support the growth in the older adult population. Remarkably, the majority of the innovations in policy, urban design, service delivery and construction have been only locally initiated and rarely replicated at a national scale.

The Congress of New Urbanism is uniquely positioned to play a role in moving the country from pilot programs to national role out of community-based aging programs. Long-term care is increasingly understood as an urban issue as well as a service system issue. Well structured neighborhoods keep residents healthier, more engaged, and less dependent on institutional care. This is especially true when health and wellness services are filtered in through the neighborhood setting.

This session will look at the national policy changes necessary to move innovation in neighborhood based care to scale in the areas of Flexible Long Term Care, Housing Finance to Support Housing Choice, and Accessible Environments.

M. Scott Ball, Senior Project Manager, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Robert Jenkens, Vice President, Community Solutions Group, LLC

Kathryn Lawler, External Affairs Manager, Atlanta Regional Commission


Mechanical vs. Passive Technology: Looking for Balance in Building Science

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session will discuss tensions between mechanical and passive technologies in commercial and residential buildings. Advocates of passive systems argue that mechanical systems are an unnecessary complication and expensive; often resulting in buildings without the resilience to withstand power interruptions. Advocates of mechanical systems argue that many passive systems are unappealing to the market in many regions with even modest variations in temperature, and that the lack of understanding of humidity results in higher energy bills and mold issues.

William Browning, Terrapin Founder, Terrapin Bright Green

Ann B. Daigle, Program Manager, The Prince's Foundation

Hank Dittmar, Chief Executive, The Prince's Foundation

Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, Principal , Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company


Multifamily Residential Building Types for an Enhanced Public Realm

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

A growing critique of many larger-scaled new urban developments concerns the quality of the architecture and construction, particularly of multifamily housing. This session explores multifamily building types that can complement or even enhance the public realm of walkable urban places, at every scale, while also satisfying developers’ objectives for investment-grade income property or marketable ownership units. How can an understanding of urban residential building types inform more competent urban placemaking? Can better housing prototypes, or assemblages of types, be developed? Are there urban prototypes that can retain the affordability and replicability of conventional product types? How can local planning/zoning agencies be empowered to promote higher design quality in the construction of multi-family building types? Presenters will propose urban structuring solutions including case studies and diagrams, followed by a lively, open debate.

Jamie S. Gorski, Senior Vice President, Corporate Marketing, The Bozzuto Group

Brian O'Looney, Senior Associate, Torti Gallas and Partners


Today's Best Form-Based Codes

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 2:00PM - 5:00pm
AIA credits approved: 3
AICP CM Credits: 3

This session will explore each winning code in-depth, the challenges faced in writing and adopting the code, and the features of the code that make it particularly meritorious. Representatives from the team who wrote and adopted the codes will participate in the session along with Driehaus Form-Based Codes jury members. Questions from those attending the presentation will be sought and answered. This is a hands-on and informative session about best practices in Form-Based Coding.

Eduardo Castillo, Principal, Castillo Arquitectos, Guatemala

Ana Gelabert-Sanchez, AICP, Loeb Fellow at the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University

Robert Sitkowski, Real Estate Officer, University of Connecticut


Emily Talen, Ph.D., AICP, Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University

Carol Wyant, Executive Director, Form-Based Codes Institute


Florida Mobility Policies: Regional Rail to Enhance Mobility

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

For the last 44 years, the Florida East Coast (FEC) railway corridor has been limited to carrying freight only. Completed by Henry Flagler in 1912, this historic rail corridor originally provided passenger service to every major east coast downtown from Jacksonville to Key West.

This session will examine the recent alignment of land use and transportation policy and practice by many local, regional, and state agencies that have spurred a passenger rail revival in Florida, especially along Florida’s southeast coast. Examples of the current rail proposals, including the return of passengers to the historic FEC railway, will be presented along with the latest TOD planning and urban design work that has been completed to support the new passenger rail service. The economic return on investment of rail and associated TOD will be illustrated during this session using examples of successful projects from around the country, shedding some light on the question: “Can dollars rain from trains?”

This session will examine the exciting studies underway to restore stations and rehabilitate community structure to work for pedestrian and rail travel. Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council and the West Palm Beach MPO are collaborating to staff these studies and coordinate with current Tri-Rail service in the corridor. The mobility implications are enhanced by the Florida DoT's support of a three-county rail concept (South Florida East Coast Corridor Study), with regional mobility implications on a grand scale.

Michael Busha, Executive Director, Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council

Kim Delaney, Strategic Development Coordinator, Treasure Coast Regional Council

Dana Little, Urban Design Director, TCRPC


Preserving Affordability: Gentrification without Displacement

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Too often investments in poor neighborhoods have meant displacement for poor residents. New approaches are needed for transforming neighborhoods of concentrated poverty that do not presume the demolition and replacement of existing housing.

The panel will consider how the most successful ideas around strengthening the sustainability, character and diversity of neighborhoods can be applied to improve the nation’s most challenged communities for the benefit of those living there. Discussion will focus on ways that improved urban design and imaginative financing and management practices can offer alternative approaches to troubled public housing developments and other poor neighborhoods, and create vibrant mixed income buildings and communities that include current residents.

Alexander Gorlin, FAIA, Principal, Alexander Gorlin Architects

Jacky Grimshaw, Vice President for Policy, Center for Neighborhood Technology

Rosanne Haggerty, President & Founder , Common Ground

Jaimie Ross, Director of Affordable Housing, 1000 Friends of Florida

Alexander von Hoffman, Senior Fellow, Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University


Resilience and Adaptation

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 2:00PM - 3:15PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Resilience is the ability of a system to rebound from a negative impact usual based in diversity. Adaptation is accepting and anticipating the need to respond to changing conditions such as new climates. These fearless panelists will address the ways to prepare for and respond to the changing conditions of our world while moving towards more sustainable lifestyles.

Joanna Alimanestianu, Project Leader, Bahia Muyuyo project

Keith Bowers, FASLA, RLA, PWS, President, Biohabitats Inc.

Stephen Coyle, AIA, LEEP-AP, Owner, Town-Green

Duncan Crary, Podcaster/Author, The KunstlerCast

Scott Douglass, Designer, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Karja Hansen, Director's Fellow, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Seth Harry, AIA, President, Seth Harry & Associates, Inc.

Glenn Kellogg, Principal, UrbanAdvisors Ltd

James Howard Kunstler, Author

Michael Mehaffy, Managing Director, Sustasis Foundation

Robert Orr, FAIA, LEED, Principal, Robert Orr & Associates LLC


CNU 20 Art Room: Watercolor: Composition and Technique by David Csont

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

Watercolor painting bridges the gap between hardcore information and artistry. You’ll learn how to begin with a quick sketch and value study, and then how to use a simplified palette of watercolors for maximum effect in your painting.

Digital rendering has become the standard choice of many architects and planners today. But when the project calls for the image to convey a strong sense of mood and character, no media does it better than traditional watercolor. Bridging the gap between technical design communication and artistry, watercolor painting leaves a lasting impression in the eye of the viewer.

Explore the possibilities of watercolor with David R. Csont, Principal and Chief Illustrator with Urban Design Associates. With over 25 years of experience rendering architecture and urban design, David has developed an internationally known and award winning style of painting in watercolor. His technique focuses on the use of a bold color palette, dynamic use of composition, and strong line drawing that transports the viewer into the world of the image.

This session will include discussions about using a quick sketch as the framework for a watercolor painting, creating a value study as a reference for your painting, using a simplified palette of colors to get maximum effect, and other opportunities to use watercolor to strengthen the message of your drawing.

David Csont, Urban Design Associates


Form-Based Economic Development on Main Street

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Sustainable Design (LU/HSW/SD)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The utilization of form-based planning and coding as the "master developer" can facilitate the evolution of sustainable neighborhoods and result in value capture for investment in needed infrastructure. Supporting incremental, small scale development, this approach provides opportunities for modest private investments and strategic public investments to create urban development in downtowns and aging commercial corridors, providing for jobs and “main street” urban living. Presented by both the designer and developer, the session will be presented through the lens of a reinvented Main Street in a landlocked aging suburb.

Monte Anderson, CEO/President, Options Real Estate Investments, Inc.

Scott Polikov, Principal, Gateway Planning Group


Time is on Our Side

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Unlike conventional "master-planned" communities—which define land-use and spatial form for all time—New Urbanism established a framework that is inherently flexible and accommodating of changing uses and redevelopment in response to changes in economics, demographics and technology. Time is the enemy of rigid master plans, but the friend and collaborator of the well-conceived urban plan.

This session will outline how incremental development tactics harness the benefits of time in a new urban community and a revitalizing city, focusing on development increments, flexibility and successional development.

Barry Alberts, Managing Partner, CityVisions Associates

C. David Coffey, Attorney at Law, C. David Coffey PA

Todd Zimmerman, Co-Managing Director, Zimmerman/Volk Associates, Inc.


Seminal New Urbanism in the Sunshine State: Critique of Florida legacy projects Seaside, Baldwin Park, and Mizner Park, and how they are shaping development in 2012 and beyond

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session will examine and critique three seminal Florida projects: Seaside, the first new urban town; Mizner Park, the first total redevelopment of a shopping mall into a town center; and Baldwin Park, the first redevelopment of a military base into a new urban neighborhood.

Jorge Camejo, Executive Director, Hollywood, FL Community Redevelopment Agency

Daryl Davis

Robert Davis, Partner, Seaside Community Dev. Corp (SCDC) Arcadia Land Company

Geoffrey Mouen, Principal, Geoffrey Mouen Architects

Eric Osth, AIA, Principal, Urban Design Associates

David Pace, New Broad Street Management

John Torti, FAIA, LEED AP, President, Torti Gallas and Partners


Understanding the Role of Sustainable Urbanism in the Conservative Agenda

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

The majority of Americans identify themselves as “conservatives.” But this term embraces a broad range that includes fiscal conservatives, social conservatives, Tea Party members, and the Agenda 21 faction. This session will focus on how to communicate the elements of Sustainable Urbanism that advance broad, common agendas, in a way that enables community buy-in. The session will feature conservative journalist Jim Bacon, author of Boomergeddon, who will be joined by the US Green Building Council’s Center for Green School’s team, which has led an astonishing transformation of 16.6 million square feet of LEED-certified US educational facilities, 65% of them in the last two years with the support of conservatives in many school districts.

James Bacon, Publisher, Bacon’s Rebellion

Rachel Gutter, United States Green Building Council

Julie Hile, President, Hile Group

Daniel K. Slone, Esquire, Partner, McGuireWoods LLP


New Urbanism and Historic Preservation: Collaboration Strategies

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

While New Urbanism and historic preservation share many values and tools, in practice the two fields have typically acted separately and viewed one another with skepticism. But as more New Urbanist projects engage existing and historic neighborhoods, and as TNDs become eligible for landmark designation, the need for cooperation between the fields will only increase. With the 30th anniversary of Seaside in 2011, the “inaugural” TND becomes theoretically eligible for designation as a historic district, raising questions about what scenarios might follow from such designation. How would managing Seaside as a historic district continue or differ from the code-based way it has been managed so far?

Conversely, how might New Urbanist planners manage growth and change in a historic district and how might that differ from current practices guided by the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation? The two fields can work together to promote the sustainable, walkable communities envisaged by the Charter for the New Urbanism, but discussion of points of both convergence and conflict is necessary to assure appropriate forms of collaboration.

Pratt Cassity, Director, Center for Community Design, University of GA

John Massengale, Principal, Massengale & Co LLC

Steven W. Semes, Academic Director, Rome Studies Program, University of Notre Dame


Clearer Thinking: Urbanism + Transit

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

There is a serious disconnect between new urbanist designs for communities and the needs of regional transit systems. This disconnect is most apparent at the two Charter-defined scales of the neighborhood, district and corridor, and the block, street and building. Transit operations may dictate transit alignment, service and frequency, and these demands are often in conflict with urbanism and local placemaking.

Two of the best thinkers about transit and place will reflect on 20 years of New Urbanism and transit oriented development (TOD): GB Arrington, leader in Portland Oregon’s famous TOD program, and Jarrett Walker, author of “Human Transit: How Clearer Thinking about Public Transit Can Enrich Our Communities and Our Lives.” These two will bring their unique perspectives and vast experience to this discussion and critique of the current state of the practice as we’ve moved from the Pedestrian Pocket, to Transit Oriented Design, to Development Oriented Transit, and beyond.

G.B. Arrington, Principal Practice Leader, Parson Brinckerhoff | PlaceMaking

Marcy McInelly, AIA, President, Urbsworks, Inc

Jarrett Walker, Consultant in Public Transport Planning and Policy, Jarrett Walker & Associates


Growing "In" in the 21st Century: Incremental Growth Patterns

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Redevelopment is changing so that cities need to allow more flexibility for small builders and developers while still creating a harmonious public realm that is sustainable and walkable. From “foot logic” to “living streets”, from incremental infrastructure to “radical radials,” this group of thinkers will tackle new development paradigms for the new century.

Howard M. Blackson III, Principal, Placemakers, LLC

Brian Canin, AIA, AICP, President, Canin Associates

Paul Crabtree, P.E., President, Crabtree Group, Inc.

Bruce F. Donnelly, Urban Planner, Office of Bruce F. Donnelly

Audun Engh, Project Manager

Aljoscha Hofmann, Dipl. Ing. Arch., TU Berlin, Think Berl!n

Kevin Klinkenberg, Senior Planner, Olsson Associates

Michael Mehaffy, Managing Director, Sustasis Foundation

Marisa Novara, Project Manager, Metropolitan Planning Council


CNU 20 Art Room: Observational Painting in Oils by James Howard Kunstler

Friday, May 11, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

For years, James Howard Kunstler has used the process of plein air painting in oils to help focus his gaze and clarify his observations of the American built landscape. Please join us as we warmly welcome James Howard Kunstler for a discussion of his observational paintings in oil.

Mr. Kunstler has been focusing his keen critical eye on the American public realm for many years. His writings and lectures have lucidly expressed the strong challenges that New Urbanists face every day with the advent of the new century. For years, Mr. Kunstler has used the process of plein air painting in oils to help focus his observations. His luminous paintings seek to capture the spirit and nature of things as they are, warts and all. Please join us as Mr. Kunstler discusses his ever-growing portfolio of beautiful and informative oil painting work.

James Howard Kunstler, Author


To the Developing World and Back Again: The International application of New Urbanism

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session will showcase research on the relationship between urban form and New Urbanism. A number of papers were selected for their academic rigor, originality, scholarship, and creativity. If you are interested in the most recent urban form investigations and trends, you won’t want to miss this session!

Jaime Correa, Founding Partner, Jaime Correa and Associates

Patricia Glanville, Heritage Architect, Ministry of Tourism Parks Culture and Sport

Dipu Gupta , Adjunct Professor of Architecture & Urbanism, University of California, Merced

Sheuli Mitra, Associate Professor in Planning, Department of Planning, School of Planning and Architecture, Bhopal, India

Tapas Mitra, Assistant Professor in Architecture, Department of Architecture, School of Planning and Architecture, Bhopal, India

Lesley Pories, Candidate, Master of City and Regional Planning (2013), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Open Source Congress

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 5:00 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

The Open Source Congress is the DIY forum that arises annually during the Congress for the New Urbanism. You can use the time and space to talk about new ideas, find help on a thorny problem, or work on a CNU initiative.

Follow updates on Twitter at #cnuopen.

After the Congress
This year, the Open Source notes and follow-up will truly be do-it-yourself. Open Source Hosts will be given a sign-in sheet to keep for participants’ contact information. A Posterous site has been set up for posting session notes, and anyone with the site email address can post their notes simply by emailing them to the address. If participants want to move Initiative items forward, they should contact CNU staff after the Congress.
http://cnu-open-source-congress.posterous.com/
To post, send email to cnu-open-source-congress@posterous.com


Rainwater-In-Context Speed Presentations

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Leaders of CNU’s Rainwater-In-Context-Initiative report from the stormfront of Green Infrastructure and Community Design in a lightning fast Pecha Kucha. Learn how New Urbanists respond to the tsunami of surface water runoff regulations. Following the Pecha Kucha, attendees will participate in a working meeting.

Steve Coyle, Principal, Town-Green

Paul Crabtree, P.E., President, Crabtree Group, Inc.

Dao Doan, CFO/Senior Principal, Mainstreet Architects + Planners, Inc.

Jonathan Ford, Principal, Morris Beacon Design

Tom Low, Partner, Director of Town Planning, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Lisa Nisenson, Principal, Nisenson Consulting

Lynn Richards, Policy Director, USEPA - Office of Sustainable Communities

Kent Schwendy, Sr VP, Fuss & O'Neill Inc.

Brian Teague, PE CNU, Director of Design, Community by Design


The Paradox of Emerging Cities

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Sustainable Design (LU/HSW/SD)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Cities all over the world are transforming at rapid rates,responding to population growth, energy crisis, transportation, and demographic shifts.

Three cities will be discussed in this session:

The low-rise scale of Tel Aviv is changing with the unwelcome entry of high-rise towers. The towers are built on sites adjacent to historic buildings that are being renovated by developers in exchange for exorbitant development rights.

Dubai, a city of superhighways, superblocks and super high-rises, is rapidly developing in a disconnected pattern of homogenous enclaves. This paradigm undermines physical accessibility by pedestrians, automobiles, and public and private transit. The result is an environment with no inherent vibrancy or the sustainability of compact, complex, complete, and equitable urbanism.

Huxindao Island in Xiamen, a major coastal city in southern China, is the site for 2 million square feet of high-density development. This planned community adapts to issues of local culture, climate, technology, and incorporates an architectural vocabulary found in both traditional Chinese and Mediterranean architecture.

Doug S. Kelbaugh, FAIA, Professor of Architecture and Urban Planning, Taubmann College of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Michigan

Daniel Solomon, Principal, Daniel Solomon Design Partners

Paul Whalen, AIA, Partner, Robert A.M. Stern Architects LLP


Hispaniola: Birthplace of the Latin American City

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Hispaniola was discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1492, and was the first island in the New World settled by the Spanish. By 1550, the indigenous culture of the Taino Indians had vanished from the island, and Hispaniola became a neglected backwater of the Spanish Empire. Nonetheless, scattered across the island, the Spanish left behind town layouts that reflected their cultural heritage. Santo Domingo was a walled city, modeled after those of medieval Spain, and for three decades was the seat of Spanish power and culture in the New World. The layout of the city followed the classic European grid pattern, with several plazas. After a period under French control, the eastern portion of the island became independent and known as the Dominican Republic. A massive migration from rural to urban areas characterized the twentieth century, with nearly 60 percent of Dominicans living nowadays in urban areas. The capital, Santo Domingo, is the largest city by far. In recent decades, various mono-zoned, exclusive residential enclaves have appeared along with all-inclusive hotels, both sitting starkly in contrast to the surviving villages and towns of colonial breeding. Local and neighboring New Urbanists are gradually challenging the legal constructs that facilitate such incongruent insertions in the fabric of the landscape.

On the western end of the island, French colonists held control until 1789, when revolution in France sparked dissension in the colony. In 1804, the rebel generals declared independence, inaugurating Haiti as the first sovereign "black" country in the modern world and the second colony in the Western Hemisphere to gain independence from imperial Europe. Since its independence, the country has had moments of great glory and abysmal misfortune. In its cities, early twentieth century bourgeoisie, foreign entrepreneurs, and the Catholic clergy blended French and southern United States Victorian architectural styles over a gridiron urban pattern. In the aftermath of January 2010 earthquake, words failed to describe the overwhelming challenges and needs of the Haitian people. Immediately following the initial devastation, numerous nations, non-governmental organizations, private foundations and ordinary citizens contributed to the Haitian relief efforts, including initiatives by several New Urbanists.

This session will explore recent interventions in Santo Domingo and Haiti.

Sonia Chao, Director, Center for Urban and Community Design

Carmen Guerrero, Assistant Professor in Practice, Registered Architect, University of Miami School of Architecture

Denis Hector

Omar Ranciel

Victor Santana


West Palm Story: Downtown Back from the Brink

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Twenty years ago, downtown West Palm Beach was dying. Clematis Street, like Main Streets across the country, was failing. Where CityPlace now stands, 14 city blocks of intact urbanism had been razed for a failed redevelopment scheme.

This session will describe how dynamic city leaders and a foresighted planning team turned downtown around, with particular attention to the role played by a pioneering Form-Based Code. A panel of local experts will add their personal insights, including thoughts on the latest downtown master plan and code.

Anthea Gianniotes, AICP, Urban Designer/Town Planner, Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council

Dana Little, Urban Design Director, TCRPC

Joseph Minicozzi, AICP, New Projects Director, Public Interest Projects, Inc.

Kimberly Mitchell, City Commissioner, City of West Palm Beach

Bill Spikowski, FAICP, Principal, Spikowski Planning Associates

Joseph Verdone, AICP, Carlton Fields


Functional Classification: The Least Interesting Policy That Dominates Most Everything

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Functional Classification, the conceptual basis behind highway, street and network planning, also impacts all transit planning, determines bicycle solutions, and unknowingly, establishes where we can walk. Even zoning ordinances and comprehensive plans are tied to functional classification. This session presents a brief history of functional classification in planning, its detrimental impacts to urbanism, and explores alternative classification and planning ideas that can promote more livable, walkable streets and sustainable cities.

Laurence Aurbach, Editor and Researcher, Office of Laurence Aurbach

Richard Hall, P.E., President, Hall Planning & Engineering Inc.


Tactical Urbanism, Economics and Community

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Make change faster, engage many voices and show us the money. This three fold session allows you to participate in workshopping the latest ideas with the leading voices in the Tactical Urbanism initiative, engage in new way of thinking about community and community engagement and address the economics of entertainment districts and of sprawl.

Randall Anway, Principal, New Tapestry LLC

Dan Bartman, Senior Planner, City of Somerville, MA

Ellen Dunham-Jones, Professor of Architecture and Urban Design, Georgia Institute of Technology

Anthony Garcia, Principal, The Street Plans Collaborative

Nathaniel Hood, Urban/Transportation Planner

Kristen Jeffers, Grassroots Planner and Placemaker

Mike Lydon, Principal, The Street Plans Collaborative

Russell S. Preston, Design Director, Principle Group

Ralph Rosado

Rick Rybeck, Director, Just Economics LLC


CNU 20 Art Room: Architectural Rendering in Watercolor Wash by John and Jennifer Griffin and Evocative Pastel Travel Sketching by Andrew Georgiadis

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

Special Art Room Double Demonstration!!

Learn the fundamentals of this classic watercolor rendering process. Technique demonstrated will include drawing setup, running a basic wash, laying a graded wash, painting skies with clouds, and conventions for painting reflected light, shades, and shadows.

This workshop will demonstrate the technical art of traditional Beaux-Arts rendering in watercolor wash through the example of painting architectural elevations. An overview of the rendering process will include a brief discussion on the selection and preparation of watercolor paper, mixing paint, and working with an appropriate brush. Various techniques will be demonstrated including running a basic wash, laying a graded wash, painting skies with clouds, and understanding conventions for reflected light, shades, and shadows. Hands-on participation will be encouraged throughout this interactive session with the possible inclusion of more advanced techniques such as rendering marble, reflected shadows, and entourage.

AND

Soft pastels are a vivid medium well-suited to the representation of architecture through luminous fields of color. Learn to use pastels when you travel to capture the fleeting play of light on urban space through blending, texture, and layering.

Soft pastels are an imprecise medium, less suited to representation of architecture through lines, but well suited to creating fields of color. Though it is dry, pastel is a painterly medium, which may be smudged and blended more easily than other media. Bring your pastels and some “toothy” paper upon which to sketch. We will be working from photographs, but will pretend we are sitting outdoors in an Italian piazza, capturing the fleeting aspects of the urban space through texture, blending, and layering of pastels on our drawings.

Andrew Georgiadis, Dover Kohl & Partners

Jennifer Griffin, Designer, Hartman-Cox Architects

John Griffin, Torti Gallas and Partners


The Reality of Live-Work Today

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

To coincide with the release of the first book on live-work - to be published in April - this session will detail the range of live-work types, from the loft to the flexhouse. The evolution and challenges of this flexible development type will be presented by the book's author, architect Thomas Dolan, including a discussion of the live-work market and development experience.

Tom Dolan, CNU-A, Principal, Thomas Dolan Architecture

Frank Starkey, President, Longleaf Development Co.

Todd Zimmerman, Co-Managing Director, Zimmerman/Volk Associates, Inc.


Seaside 30th Anniversary: Architecture can transcend style

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

With the 30th anniversary of Seaside in 2011, the “inaugural” New Urbanism project theoretically becomes eligible for designation as a historic district. Seaside was the first on many fronts:

1) The original graphic code led to the development of form-based codes

2) The architectural code recovered an interest in vernacular architecture

3) Prudent financial planning underpinned many sustainability concepts

4) The use of native species is now commonly referred to as Xeriscape

This session will take a close look at Seaside and examine its influence and transcendence from style to a movement.

Walter Chatham, Walter Chatham Architect

Robert Davis, Partner, Seaside Community Dev. Corp (SCDC) Arcadia Land Company

Alexander Gorlin, FAIA, Principal, Alexander Gorlin Architects

Scott Merrill, Merrill, Pastor & Colgan Architects


A Brief History of the New World

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session will survey aspects of the history of Latin American architecture and urbanism: the colonial city, the suburban expansion of the metropolis, the foundation of new modern cities in terra incognita, and the era of transect transgressions and informalities on the periphery.

Ramon Abonce, Director of Architecture and New Urbanism Masters Program, Tecnologico de Monterrey Campus Queretaro

Jaime Correa, Founding Partner, Jaime Correa and Associates

Adib Cure

Seth Harry, AIA, President, Seth Harry & Associates, Inc.

Jean-Francois LeJeune, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, University of Miami

Claudia Ortiz-Chao, Director of Architecture and New Urbanism Masters Program, Tecnologico de Monterrey Campus Queretaro


Designing and Developing Walkable Urban Grocery Stores

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Developing supermarkets in urban, mixed-use structures comes with a unique set of demands and challenges. It takes work to distinguish such stores from suburban stand-alone structures and further, differentiating such developments from other mixed-used structures. This session, which combines a regional supermarket operator, a national mixed-use developer and an architect for such mixed-use structures, will highlight the multiple aspects of this product type’s delivery and operations.

John Given, Principal, Investment & Development, CIM Group

Neal Payton, AIA, Principal, Torti Gallas and Partners, Inc.

David Taulbee, AIA, Architectural Manager, Publix Super Markets Inc.


Charrettes and the Next Generation of Public Involvement

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Are the days of the seven-day charrette behind us? Shrinking budgets, social media, tea party obstruction… it's time to take another look at charrettes and public involvement.

Limited project budgets are challenging everyone. The web has also made it possible for the public, as well as consultants, to participate from a distance. This technology can save money, but what are the costs to shared learning and the building of relationships? How can these high-tech tools be leveraged to increase the number and diversity of people that are engaged in planning projects while still maintaining the advantages of face-to-face meetings?

This session will present the latest tools, techniques and the trade-offs of social media and web-based participation tools within the context of the face-to-face public design charrette format.

Hazel Borys, Managing Principal, PlaceMakers

Ben Brown, Consultant, PlaceMakers LLC

Andrés Duany, Principal, Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company

Bill Lennertz, Executive Director, National Charrette Institute

Gianni Longo, Principal, ACP Visioning & Planning


Realizing Streets for Everyone, and Getting Someone Else to Pay for Them: Funding, Designing
and Implementing Complete Streets

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

States and local jurisdictions are using Complete Streets policies and principles to enable walkable communities. The result is a paradigm shift in the way jurisdictions approach transportation planning, requiring an integrated land use/transportation approach that is often characterized by the charrette process, ensuring that the public street realm is designed holistically in context with overall placemaking. Many jurisdictions are turning to mechanisms such as Form Based Codes to insure that Complete Streets principles are integrated into planning for small and large areas.

This session will discuss non-traditional funding such as public-private partnerships and other techniques to implement Complete Streets, including developing competitive projects for programs such as TIGER and Sustainable Community Challenge Grants.

It is imperative that practitioners understand the implications of new legislation and policies in order to position ourselves to take advantage of the new requirements for projects and funding. This session will seek to provide an understanding of the role of Complete Streets/Thoroughfares in achieving balanced, walkable environments and how to implement Complete Streets from a regulatory standpoint, as well as how emerging design guidelines such as Walkable Urban Thoroughfares: A Context Sensitive Approach can be used to create walkable networks within the context of thoroughfare planning. The sessions will present examples from around the country where the principles of Complete Streets have been implemented, ranging from retrofits (both reconstruction and simple pavement reallocations) to new, integrated designs and discuss techniques of how local municipalities are securing funding, collaborating with affected residents and business owners, and ultimately implementing a Complete Street/Thoroughfare.

This session will also discuss how Federal, state, and local agencies are responding to the upcoming legislative and funding changes, and how initiatives such as Complete Streets Acts and Form Based Codes give agencies and jurisdictions an advantage under the Federal funding criteria. The session will present upcoming Federal funding programs available to implement Complete Streets and Thoroughfares and provide an update for ongoing efforts to update transportation design guidelines to more adequately mesh with smart growth and the upcoming Surface Transportation Act Reauthorization. The role of the roadbulding lobby and their negative, and positive, influence on modal mix will also be discussed.

Kim Briesemeister, CRA Director, Redevelopment Manager, City of West Palm Beach CRA

Adam Kerr, Transportation Engineer, Kimley-Horn and Associates

Frederick Schwartz, Senior Vice President, Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc

G. Wade Walker, Director of Transportation Planning, Fuss & O'Neill

Matt Ward, CEO, Sustainable Strategies DC


Across the Transect: From Historic Preservation to Composting

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 2:00pm - 3:15 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

From the Prince's Foundation work in the Galapagos Islands to historic Miami neighborhoods to composting across the “Trashy Transect,” sample the wide variety of ways in which practitioners are balancing natural habitats with human habitats. Tackle high and low tech transect analysis with “Geeks and Grounders” from GIS automation to photographic DNA.

Alexander Adams, Preservation Officer, City of Miami

Hector Fernando Burga, Co-Founder Up-Lab, Up-lab

Peter Quintanilla, Senior Design Advisor, The Prince's Foundation

Samantha Singer, Urban Project Manager, The Prince's Foundation

Jennifer Siqueira, Co-Founder Up-Lab, Up-Lab

Sandy Sorlien, Transect Codes Council

Emily Talen, Ph.D., AICP, Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University


CNU 20 Art Room: Digital Painting with the iPad and with Photoshop by Joe Skibba & JJ Zanetta

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

Digital painting is a powerful new tool full of possibilities for urban illustrators. The first half of this session will demonstrate rapid application of color to an image using the iPad. In the second half, more detailed digital painting techniques with Photoshop will be explored.

This workshop is co-presented by two traditional artists who have incorporated digital rendering techniques into their workflow. For those of you who produce drawings and would like to apply some quick color to an image, the first half of the workshop will be very interesting. Joe Skibba will demonstrate how to enhance your drawings by applying quick color using the iPad. In the second half of the workshop, J.J Zanetta will take a closer look at more careful digital painting using Photoshop. He’ll demonstrate how you can create a more highly refined digital painting starting with line art or a model wireframe. We will examine creative digital tools, brushes, and textures, software and hardware options, and the process of digital painting.

Joe Skibba

John J Zanetta


Small is Beautiful: Local economic networks of the pre-auto era

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Learning Unit (LU)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

There was a time, before 1940, when local networks of economic interdependence fueled small-scale urbanism that benefited and enhanced great urban goals. Find out how cities functioned before the 1940's. How can we return to this system of interdependence? And how can placemaking contribute to that transformation?

Robert Fishman, Professor and Author, University of Michigan, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Bourgeois Utopias: The Rise and Fall of Suburbia

James Howard Kunstler, Author

Kimber Lanning, Director, Local First Arizona

Emily Talen, Ph.D., AICP, Professor, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, Arizona State University


Havana: Paradigm of a Caribbean City

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Transcending the speculative, religious, military, and formal intentions operating since the time of the conquistadores, Havana has evolved over five centuries as a harmonious, spatially identifiable city with a traditional, yet pragmatic urban plan; one that is accommodating to pedestrians and ingratiated by its public spaces and well-defined streets. Imported urban precedents, building typologies and laws have been layered upon “La Perla de las Antillas”. At first glance, the present-day layout of the city of Havana could seem haphazard due to its patchwork design pattern of ‘remnants,' but upon further inspection the stitch-work of its organization becomes more evident. Its resulting composition can be attributed to the diverse leyes (laws) and ordenanzas (codes) that over time have both been informed by and, in turn, shaped the city’s complex layout. Analysis illustrates the relevance of those inherited or home grown design concepts, and their adaptability to 21st century challenges and opportunities which sustain physical, cultural, and spiritual traditions.

Sonia Chao, Director, Center for Urban and Community Design

Eduardo Luis Rodriguez

Isabel Rigol


Achieving Sustainable Communities

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25 Sustainable Design (LU/HSW/SD)
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

This session will focus on implementation of sustainable planning principles on a regional scale in South Florida, and on a citywide scale in El Paso, Texas. Both areas are getting substantial help through the federal government. The federal Sustainable Communities Initiative is playing a key role in transforming regional planning and how housing and transportation dollars are spent.

Michael Busha, Executive Director, Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council

Victor Dover, CNU-A, Principal, Dover, Kohl & Partners

Mathew McElroy, AICP, CNU-A, Deputy Director, Planning & Economic Development, City of El Paso, TX

Shelley Poticha, Senior Adviser for Sustainable Housing and Communities, Department of Housing and Urban Development


Global Capitalism & The Tall Tower Reconsidered

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Recent trends in New Urbanism include regional and local economies, the Citta Slow and the Original Green. Hot trends in avant garde architecture and urbanism include Platinum skyscrapers and high-profile American firms working in Asia and the Middle East. In this session, CNU Founder Stefanos Polyzoides FAIA will debate the High Rise in Urbanism with New York planner, academic and former developer Vishaan Chakrabarti and James von Klemperer FAIA, Design Principal at Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF) .
Chakrabarti is the former Director of the Manhattan office of the New York City Planning Commission, and a former Executive Vice President of the Related Companies, where he ran the architecture and planning operations. He now heads the new Real Estate program in Columbia University’s architecture and urban design school, and is one of the strongest and most influential voices in New York for soaring new development. For KPF, one of the most successful high-design firms in America, von Klemperer has designed both buildings and new towns, with a number of current mixed-use projects in China and Korea. Fireworks are expected.

Vishaan Chakrabarti, Holliday Professor of Real Estate Development, Director CURE., The Center for Urban Real Estate, GSAPP, Columbia University

Peter Fleischer, Executive Director, Empire State Future

John Massengale, Principal, Massengale & Co LLC

Stefanos Polyzoides, Principal, Moule & Polyzoides Architects & Urbanists

James von Klemperer, Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates PC


Beyond Bike Lanes: Building a Culture of Bicycle Safety

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

Cycling is catching on as a viable alternative to the automobile. Bicycle commuting increased by more than 60% between 2000 and 2010 in the 70 largest cities in the U.S.. Nonetheless, cycling can be deadly, particularly in Florida, which is home to the four most dangerous cities for pedestrians and cyclists. While New Urbanists have been at the forefront of efforts to promote bicycle infrastructure, simply building bike lanes is not enough to reduce cycling-related deaths and injuries. In this session we will hear from leaders at the forefront of Florida’s bicycle safety movement and discuss strategies for combining infrastructure, programming, advocacy, and policy to create a broader culture of bicycle safety.

Keri Caffrey, Co-founder, CyclingSavvy

DeWayne Carver, Senior Project Manager, Hall Planning & Engineering, Inc

Robert Kamm, Executive Director, Space Coast Transportation Planning Agency


Sprawl Repair and Infill: From Incremental to Wetrofit to Agriculture

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 3:45PM - 5:00PM
AIA credits approved: 1.25
AICP CM Credits: 1.25

From infrastructure to architecture to backyard gardening, explore a variety of sprawl repair and infill innovations. Topics include: growing food at all scales, incremental sprawl repair, the Sky Method applied to sprawl repair, a new kind of rental home, right-sized housing, and “Wetrofit” for green infrastructure.

Harriet Festing, Director, Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT)

Neil Heller, Urbanist, Community by Design LLC

Jennifer Hurley, AICP, NJPP, CNU-A, President & CEO, Hurley-Franks & Associates

Henry Melendy, Owner and President, My Yard Farm, LLC

Steve A. Mouzon, AIA, LEED, Principal , The New Urban Guild

Robert Sharp, Principal, Robert Sharp Architect, Inc., Partners for Better Housing

Brian Teague, PE CNU, Director of Design, Community by Design

Tony Weremeichik, Principal, Architectural Design Studio

Greg Witherspoon, Vice President, Canin Associates


CNU 20 Art Room: Photo-Realistic Before and After Sequences in Photoshop by Steve Price

Date To Be Determined
Please check back for updates on AIA and AICP credits

Learn to construct a convincing change-over-time transformation in Photoshop. Techniques covered will include: placing architecture, creating realistic shadows, adding paving and roadway markings in perspective, placing trees, and other tricks of the trade.

Steve Price will demonstrate how the remarkable tools hidden in Photoshop give urban designers the means to demonstrate positive urban change in a highly convincing way. By creating a photo-transformation based on a photograph of a familiar place, designers can assist citizens to evaluate design and development interventions compared with what is there now. Steve will demonstrate construction of a photo-transformation while explaining important techniques such as: placing architecture, creating realistic shadows, putting in paving and roadway markings in perspective, placing trees, and showing change in steps.

Steve Price, Owner, Illustrator, Urban Advantage Inc.